Saturday, December 15, 2018
politiko-politics-ph-logo

Saludo, lolo! Cabuyao Councilor Tutti Caringal pays tribute to grandpa Fortunato Abat on his demise

Mar 9, 2018 @ 15:33

Cabuyao Councilor Tutti Caringal is proud to be the grandson of former Defense Secretary Fortunato Abat, who passed away on March 7 at the age of 92.

As a rocker-politiko, Caringal is far from the straight-backed soldier that was his grandfather.

But he is in awe of his lolo’s accomplishments, who has a long history of serving the country under different Presidents.

Aside from being defense secretary, Abat served as commanding general of the Philippine Army, Ambassador to China, and Deputy Director General of the National Security Council.

Abat was also the government’s chief negotiator in peace talks with the Moro Islamic Liberation Front. His last assignment in the government, before retiring from public service was as chair of the Military Service Board.

Thank you for your service!

“Former Defense Secretary Fortunato U. Abat died on March 7, 2018. He was 92. Until his retirement from public service in 2004, Sec. Abat served in various capacities in government, the longest being with the Philippine Army. He entered military service as a guerilla during the Second World War, and rose through the ranks before his appointment by President Ferdinand Marcos as Commanding General of the Philippine Army, a position he held for five (5) years, the longest in the Army’s history. He then served as Ambassador to the People’s Republic of China before his appointment by President Corazon C. Aquino as Undersecretary of the Department of National Defense and later, as Deputy Director General of the National Security Council. He was then tapped by President Fidel V. Ramos to serve as Chief Negotiator of the Government of the Republic of the Philippines’ peace talks with the Moro Islamic Liberation Front and then eventually as Secretary of National Defense. During the term of President Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo, Sec. Abat was appointed as President of the John Hay – Poro Point Development Corporation in his native La Union. He finally served as Chairman of the Military Service Board during the term of President Benigno S. Aquino III. Sec. Abat is survived by his wife, Corazon, and his children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren. Old soldiers never die. They just fade away. Goodbye lolo. PROUD TO BE YOUR GRANDSON! SALUTE!!! #day1 #fortunatoabat 🙏👊🏼🤘,” he posted.

Former Defense Secretary Fortunato U. Abat died on March 7, 2018. He was 92. Until his retirement from public service in 2004, Sec. Abat served in various capacities in government, the longest being with the Philippine Army. He entered military service as a guerilla during the Second World War, and rose through the ranks before his appointment by President Ferdinand Marcos as Commanding General of the Philippine Army, a position he held for five (5) years, the longest in the Army's history. He then served as Ambassador to the People's Republic of China before his appointment by President Corazon C. Aquino as Undersecretary of the Department of National Defense and later, as Deputy Director General of the National Security Council. He was then tapped by President Fidel V. Ramos to serve as Chief Negotiator of the Government of the Republic of the Philippines' peace talks with the Moro Islamic Liberation Front and then eventually as Secretary of National Defense. During the term of President Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo, Sec. Abat was appointed as President of the John Hay – Poro Point Development Corporation in his native La Union. He finally served as Chairman of the Military Service Board during the term of President Benigno S. Aquino III. Sec. Abat is survived by his wife, Corazon, and his children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren. Old soldiers never die. They just fade away. Goodbye lolo. PROUD TO BE YOUR GRANDSON! SALUTE!!! #day1 #fortunatoabat 🙏👊🏼🤘

A post shared by tutti caringal (@tarantutti) on

Politiko would love to hear your views on this...
Recommended Articles
Disclaimer:
The comments posted on this site do not necessarily represent or reflect the views of management and owner of POLITICS.com.ph. We reserve the right to exclude comments that we deem to be inconsistent with our editorial standards.

Trending News

Want Politiko alerts on your inbox? Subscribe here.